Saturday, October 12, 2013

A Passing Disturbance



A small storm passed to the south of town last night. It was producing quite a bit of lightning, so I grabbed my photo equipment and headed out. The first photo has a silhouette of a old brick making company in the foreground. It has not been in operation since I have lived here. As the storm changed and moved away from town, I was forced to move a few of times to catch up. The two bottom photos are from my last set up. The storm was moving away to reveal a star lit sky while still producing lightning.

10 comments:

  1. Spectacular night captures! Like night and day at the trailing edge of the storm,

    ReplyDelete
  2. Very cool! I have to agree with Paul, these are spectacular and the last two photos are amazing shots. I really like the middle shot the best.

    ReplyDelete
  3. We also had stormy nights for the last couple of days. Very loud nights! These shots are great.

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography


    ReplyDelete
  4. Super shots! Amazing power in a thunderstorm and you captured it well!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Absolutely amazing. How do you manage to get the lightning? Do you have one of those gadgets that senses the lightning and snaps the picture?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No fancy gadgets! Its not to complicated on how to get these. First of you will need a remote that you can lock the shutter on and off, a tripod and to set your camera to manual mode. Then change your shutter to bulb and your aperture to f/8, next switch your focus to manual and set the focus distance to just under infinity. In my experience your ISO will range from 200-800, depending on how bright the lightning is, ie brighter lightning lower ISO and vice versa, 400 is a good starting point. With the camera set, pick a spot in the storm with the most activity and try to frame your shot the way you want, you may need to make minor adjustments to get it level and just the way you want. Now open the shutter and wait for a strike. After the strike close the shutter. Sometimes depending on the distance of the lighting and conditions you can leave the shutter open for multiple strikes. If they are really bright ones, one is all you will be able to get before it will be to bright and wash the sensor out. Sometimes the shutter will be open a long time, the second photo is a 46 second exposure. If you don't have a remote, you can use a short shutter, say 20 seconds or so. The only problem with that is if the lightning is really bright and you get multiple strikes it will wash the sensor out. It took me a few practice experiences to get it figured out. Good luck and hopefully I didn't make it to complicated. It is one thing I really love to do.

      Delete
    2. Thanks Aaron. Actually I understood exactly what you said and I do have a remote for my D70 but not my D3100. This is something I actually want to try sometime.
      Thanks again.

      Felicia

      Delete
  6. WOW and WOW....... Nice work! Make sure to ask Ron to pose for you with a long metal pole next time. lol

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for taking the time to look at our blog, we appreciate your comments!