Saturday, April 7, 2012

Last night's Moon

The Moon was particularly clear and bright last night so I took a few pictures of it. The shot that worked out best was with the camera set to -5 exposure, aperture at f8 and using the Sigma 120-400 with the optical stabilization turned off. The final picture is a crop of about 25% of the original.

11 comments:

  1. that is beautiful! and the moon was almost harvest orange!

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  2. wow, makes my attempt look feeble!! Thanks for posting your camera settings, I will have to try again. What was your ISO set to?

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  3. Val the ISO was 200 and the shutter speed was 1/320 though I have my camera set up to select it's own ISO anywhere between 200 and 1600 with the shutter speed set to minimum 1/250 sec.
    Setting the exposure to -5 seemed to make the biggest improvement for this shot.

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  4. This is a very nice shot!!

    I was thinking about doing the same thing last night as I was driving home from dinner but by the time I got home a pair of sweat pants and the couch sounded like a better idea! LOL

    Why did you turn the OS off?

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  5. Ron I read somewhere that you're not sopposed to use VR or OS when the lens is on a tripod as it can add blur! Though I didn't see any difference with it on or off.

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  6. Thanks Paul, I'll have to try again!!

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  7. Tripod... Not a chance! I steadied the lens on the rail of my porch. LOL Only time I find myself using the tripod is for long exposure night shots. Truth be known I can't remember where the silly thing even is just now.

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  8. Very, very nice! Thanks for all the settings and tips.
    Found several names for this first full moon of spring. Full Fish Moon it was called by coastal tribes and the common name was Full Pink Moon used today by the media.

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  9. Ron, The stabilization technology works by unlocking part of your lens, which allows the lens to “correct” movements. But, when your camera is sitting still on a tripod, the stabilizer will often look for movement that isn’t there, resulting in a blurry photo.

    Nice work Paul!

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